The Superheroics of Social Justice or “Action Comics #1: Awesome Then, Awesome Now.”

Action Comics #1 (June 1938), page 1: Superman...
Image via Wikipedia

You probably know about the DC Comics relaunch.  I picked up the new Action Comics #1 and really, really liked it.  Supes looks like Woody Guthrie.  He can’t fly (yet?) and is a wrecking ball for social justice.  He trifles with authorities and struggles to pay rent.  A hero for our times if there was one.

Commentators have been talking about this as a return to Superman’s activist origins.  Indeed, a read through the original Action Comics #1 from 1938 reveals a bold American character, an immigrant, “champion of the oppressed, the physical marvel who has sworn to devote his existence to helping those in need!”

I love this guy.  Read the original Action #1 here, and cheer with me as Supes dispatches the governor’s butler in a last-minute attempt to save an innocent woman from state execution.  Like I said, a hero for our time if there was one.

Should DC Have Revisited “Titans Tomorrow” for the Superman Reboot/Redesign?

I think so.

I’m still not a huge fan of the red belt pictured here, but it’s a huge improvement over what they’re actually giving him:

Must. Collect. All. Thundercat. Emblems.

I could have sworn that one of the panels I saw during the Titans Tomorrow storyline showed a belt that stopped on both sides before reaching the abs. Even if I’m misremembering that, I like it better than either of these options.  For an even better old revamp than the Titans Tomorrow design, check out what artist Sean Izaakse did in 2006:

Super, regal, updated, and iconic.

Here, the collar, cape, and shield work together to really say something about Superman’s power  Change the waist banding to a red semi-belt and that’s your rebooted Man of Steel, friends.