Anderson Cooper Hath Become…Booster Gold?

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When a friend posted a link to the breaking story about CNN striking a deal with the FAA allowing the news org to use drones for news gathering, he alluded to the image of Anderson Cooper and friends being followed around by hovering robotic companions.

I could only think of Skeets. Forget all those pictures of him with his parents in the 70s. Anderson Cooper is from the future.

Hopefully, then, he’ll stop the AI apocalypse.

andersoncooper01

Should Penn State Fire Joe Paterno?

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Main entrance of Old Main, at Penn State Unive...

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First, let me be clear: I don’t know Jerry Sandusky or anyone involved in the investigation, but I believe the allegations against him are true.

Even if they’re not, Penn State should fire Joe Paterno.

In one instance, Sandusky’s alleged conduct was reported to Paterno by an eyewitness over 10 years ago.  Paterno passed the information on to Athletic Director Tim Curley and Senior VP for Business and Finance Gary Schultz.  Curley and Schultz did nothing with the information.  On Saturday, Penn State either fired or forced the resignation of both men, who now face arraignment and further criminal investigation.

Paterno claims he did what he was supposed to do by reporting the information to Curely and Schultz.

Consider this:  If Paterno were a Catholic bishop reporting alleged abuse to some peers or cardinals instead of the police, his ass would be in the fire in the court of public opinion (if not actual court).

He needs to go.

Does President Obama Need a New Producer?

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Wag the Dog

No, you're the greatest actor of our generation. No, YOU are! And then Bill Clinton's all like, heh guys, 'member me? I'm like the Pete Rose of disbelief suspension. Settle down.

Remember all those things we realized too late that we should have done before engaging Iraq in 2003?  John Boehner does, and he’s pretty sure the President doesn’t.  From CNN:

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, sent a letter to Obama Wednesday complaining that “military resources were committed to war without clearly defining for the American people, the Congress, and our troops what the mission in Libya is and what America’s role is in achieving that mission.”

“In fact,” Boehner said, “the limited, sometimes contradictory, case made to the American people by members of your administration has left some fundamental questions about our engagement unanswered.”

Among other things, Boehner asked whether it is acceptable for Gadhafi to remain in power once the military campaign ends.

“If not, how will he be removed from power?” Boehner asked. “Why would the U.S. commit American resources to enforcing a U.N. resolution that is inconsistent with our stated policy goals and national interests?”

Boehner also posed other questions for the president. Since the “stated U.S. policy goal is removing” Gadhafi from power, “do you have an engagement strategy for the opposition forces? If the strife in Libya becomes a protracted conflict, what are your administration’s objectives for engaging with opposition forces, and what standards must a new regime meet to be recognized by our government?” his letter said.

Another piece on CNN.com has John P. Avlon proposing that the Left feels as though the world  is experiencing a third Bush term.  An interesting excerpt:

An objective assessment of the Obama record on foreign policy shows that he has not been the soft liberal ideologue that conservatives want to run against. An excellent book by my Daily Beast colleague Stephen Carter, “The Violence of Peace,” analyzes Obama’s War Doctrine at length from a legal, but readable, perspective. Carter writes, “On matters of national security, at least, the Oval Office evidently changes the outlook of its occupant far more than the occupant changes the outlook of the Oval Office.”

While Obama has changed the unilateral style of the Bush administration, he’s kept much of the substance. He has drawn down troops in Iraq, as promised. But on many other fronts, he has found that campaign rhetoric often does not square with the responsibilities of governing.

Because many on the left define themselves in opposition to authority, they are historically quick to turn on presidents of their own party for being insufficiently liberal — whether it is Truman’s and Kennedy’s Cold Warrior enthusiasm, LBJ’s escalation of the Vietnam War, Jimmy Carter’s budget cuts or Bill Clinton’s welfare reform.

Frankly, I’m surprised that no one has brought up the fact that Clinton’s 1999 airstrikes in Kosovo were basically lifted directly from Wag the Dog.