Being Healthy Sucks Most of the Time, but Here’s a Free Guide to Being Healthy

culture, food, health

 

It’s the middle of January, “Resolution Month” at the gym. In the past, I’ve railed against “resoluters,” with their shiny new workout gear and lack of follow-through. But as I get older, I realize, hey, we’re all human. Maintaining a healthy weight means making the right choices most of the time. Making these choices takes time and often sucks. At the same time, the fitness and nutrition markets are flooded with svengali promises made by the cross fits and diet plans of the world.

The truth is, to get healthier, you don’t need to pay $200 a month for someone to yell at you or for some crazy diet that is impossible to maintain in the long-term. So I created this totally free flow chart to help guide you toward a healthier lifestyle or toward complete and utter ambivalence toward a healthier lifestyle. Happy New Year.

 

 

diet flow

 

 

Thousands of Lives Would Have Been Saved If Obama Had Backed Stronger Smog Standards

advocacy, environment, health, justice, politics

I’ve been saying  this for a long time.  But I’m glad to see an institution as reputable as Johns Hopkins come out with this study:

 Thousands of Lives Would Have Been Saved If Obama Had Backed Stronger Smog Standards

With thanks to Joe Calhoun for sharing the story. Turns out Obama’s EPA was right all along.  That’s not surprising.

Strip Malls and Big Box Stores Connected to Increase in Serious/Deadly Traffic Accidents Among Senior Citizens

economics, health

“According to a new report [PDF] from the Texas Transportation Institute at Texas A&M University, the nearly ubiquitous giant-parking-lot-plus-giant-retail outlet is associated with higher risks of injurious and deadly traffic accidents among people 75 and older. Seventy-five is the age when older adults become substantially more likely than other age cohorts to experience injury or fatality as a result of a traffic accident, mainly because of their increasingly frail bodies, but also due to their waning hearing and eyesight.”

Read more here.

I’ d never really thought about it before, but this is fairly intuitive.

Another problem is that in many areas, seniors are underserved by public transit.  That’s certainly the case in the Allentown Metro.

Search Term Mail Bag Vol. 83

health, sports

I’m usually a little silly with this feature, but the search term I want to deal with today is somber because the context is Junior Seau’s suicide.

“Is this the end of football?”

I think it is.  Not in the next few years, but in the next twenty.  Unless rules drastically change, parents are going to stop letting their children play the game.

In February, I linked to this article from Grantland.  It makes the case.

Is This the Way the NFL Ends? T. S. Eliot, Jim McMahon, And The End of Football In America

advocacy, health, sports

We are the hollow men
We are the stuffed men
Leaning together
Headpiece filled with straw. Alas!
Our dried voices, when
We whisper together
Are quiet and meaningless
As wind in dry grass
Or rats’ feet over broken glass
In our dry cellar

Shape without form, shade without colour,
Paralysed force, gesture without motion;

Those who have crossed
With direct eyes, to death’s other Kingdom
Remember us—if at all—not as lost
Violent souls, but only
As the hollow men
The stuffed men.

– From The Hollow Men by T.S. Eliot.

Jim McMahon was trending on Twitter this morning because of this interview with SportsCenter that aired yesterday.

“He had a concussion, but it cleared up by halftime.”  – a Bears team doctor in 1988.

“We knew about risks to every other part of the body.  But we didn’t know about the brain trauma.  They did.  They lied.”  – Jim McMahon

Headpieces of straw.  Paralyzed force.  Not lost, violent souls. The hollow men.  The stuffed men.

Between the desire
And the spasm
Between the potency
And the existence
Between the essence
And the descent
Falls the Shadow

This the way the NFL ends, with a bang.  With a million concussions.

I hope these players get every dime.

How Bad is Our Drug Problem?

health

Have you seen this report last month from the CDC?  Has anyone?

This 28-year study, which began in 1980, purports to show that death by poisoning is the leading cause of death from injury in the United States, and that 90 percent of these fatal poisonings are caused by drugs (both legal and illicit).  Opioid analgesics were involved in 40 percent of drug poising deaths in 2008. 2008 also marked the first year that more Americans died from poisoning than car crashes.

Is it just me, or are these staggeringly high numbers?  This isn’t a post about the usefulness or futility of that batch of policies and military actions known collectively as The War on Drugs.  But it might be a post about the glibness with which some so easily dismiss the notion of a drug problem in the US.