Asthma and Our Urban Cores: Global Impact and Direct Local Action (vote for your lungs)

advocacy, culture, justice

Like the doctor in this short and important story, I was also diagnosed with asthma in 1984. He was a Harvard med school student working in Haiti. I was a four-year old boy in Berks County making a late night emergency trip to the hospital in Allentown. If I’d lived in Haiti then, I might not have seen 5. The inequality that makes that statement true is even worse now. Please read this story. When you do, understand that our urban cores, and the 40 percent of kids in them with asthma, need preventative care just as much as kids in Haiti.

http://www.good.is/posts/the-story-of-the-miraculous-inhaler-and-why-inequality-is-everyone-s-problem/?utm_medium=tdg&utm_source=email&utm_campaign=ltitle&utm_content=What+a+%27Miracle+Cure%27+Asthma+Inhaler+Says+About+Our+Bizarrely+Unequal+World

In Allentown, this means, in part, fighting the Delto Thermo Energy incinerator rammed down our lungs.  There are two ways you can help.  If you’re voting in the May 21 Democrat primary, vote for candidates who oppose the incinerator.  These include all the challengers (Alfonso Todd, Kim Velez, David Melman, and Carmen Bell) as well as incumbent Ray O’Connell.   (Mr. O’Connell did vote for the water lease, something all four challengers oppose, as do I and many others).

It also means that come November, you should vote FOR the clean air ordinance.